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Technical: A Brief History of Payment Channels: from Satoshi to Lightning Network

Who cares about political tweets from some random country's president when payment channels are a much more interesting and are actually capable of carrying value?
So let's have a short history of various payment channel techs!

Generation 0: Satoshi's Broken nSequence Channels

Because Satoshi's Vision included payment channels, except his implementation sucked so hard we had to go fix it and added RBF as a by-product.
Originally, the plan for nSequence was that mempools would replace any transaction spending certain inputs with another transaction spending the same inputs, but only if the nSequence field of the replacement was larger.
Since 0xFFFFFFFF was the highest value that nSequence could get, this would mark a transaction as "final" and not replaceable on the mempool anymore.
In fact, this "nSequence channel" I will describe is the reason why we have this weird rule about nLockTime and nSequence. nLockTime actually only works if nSequence is not 0xFFFFFFFF i.e. final. If nSequence is 0xFFFFFFFF then nLockTime is ignored, because this if the "final" version of the transaction.
So what you'd do would be something like this:
  1. You go to a bar and promise the bartender to pay by the time the bar closes. Because this is the Bitcoin universe, time is measured in blockheight, so the closing time of the bar is indicated as some future blockheight.
  2. For your first drink, you'd make a transaction paying to the bartender for that drink, paying from some coins you have. The transaction has an nLockTime equal to the closing time of the bar, and a starting nSequence of 0. You hand over the transaction and the bartender hands you your drink.
  3. For your succeeding drink, you'd remake the same transaction, adding the payment for that drink to the transaction output that goes to the bartender (so that output keeps getting larger, by the amount of payment), and having an nSequence that is one higher than the previous one.
  4. Eventually you have to stop drinking. It comes down to one of two possibilities:
    • You drink until the bar closes. Since it is now the nLockTime indicated in the transaction, the bartender is able to broadcast the latest transaction and tells the bouncers to kick you out of the bar.
    • You wisely consider the state of your liver. So you re-sign the last transaction with a "final" nSequence of 0xFFFFFFFF i.e. the maximum possible value it can have. This allows the bartender to get his or her funds immediately (nLockTime is ignored if nSequence is 0xFFFFFFFF), so he or she tells the bouncers to let you out of the bar.
Now that of course is a payment channel. Individual payments (purchases of alcohol, so I guess buying coffee is not in scope for payment channels). Closing is done by creating a "final" transaction that is the sum of the individual payments. Sure there's no routing and channels are unidirectional and channels have a maximum lifetime but give Satoshi a break, he was also busy inventing Bitcoin at the time.
Now if you noticed I called this kind of payment channel "broken". This is because the mempool rules are not consensus rules, and cannot be validated (nothing about the mempool can be validated onchain: I sigh every time somebody proposes "let's make block size dependent on mempool size", mempool state cannot be validated by onchain data). Fullnodes can't see all of the transactions you signed, and then validate that the final one with the maximum nSequence is the one that actually is used onchain. So you can do the below:
  1. Become friends with Jihan Wu, because he owns >51% of the mining hashrate (he totally reorged Bitcoin to reverse the Binance hack right?).
  2. Slip Jihan Wu some of the more interesting drinks you're ordering as an incentive to cooperate with you. So say you end up ordering 100 drinks, you split it with Jihan Wu and give him 50 of the drinks.
  3. When the bar closes, Jihan Wu quickly calls his mining rig and tells them to mine the version of your transaction with nSequence 0. You know, that first one where you pay for only one drink.
  4. Because fullnodes cannot validate nSequence, they'll accept even the nSequence=0 version and confirm it, immutably adding you paying for a single alcoholic drink to the blockchain.
  5. The bartender, pissed at being cheated, takes out a shotgun from under the bar and shoots at you and Jihan Wu.
  6. Jihan Wu uses his mystical chi powers (actually the combined exhaust from all of his mining rigs) to slow down the shotgun pellets, making them hit you as softly as petals drifting in the wind.
  7. The bartender mutters some words, clothes ripping apart as he or she (hard to believe it could be a she but hey) turns into a bear, ready to maul you for cheating him or her of the payment for all the 100 drinks you ordered from him or her.
  8. Steely-eyed, you stand in front of the bartender-turned-bear, daring him to touch you. You've watched Revenant, you know Leonardo di Caprio could survive a bear mauling, and if some posh actor can survive that, you know you can too. You make a pose. "Drunken troll logic attack!"
  9. I think I got sidetracked here.
Lessons learned?

Spilman Channels

Incentive-compatible time-limited unidirectional channel; or, Satoshi's Vision, Fixed (if transaction malleability hadn't been a problem, that is).
Now, we know the bartender will turn into a bear and maul you if you try to cheat the payment channel, and now that we've revealed you're good friends with Jihan Wu, the bartender will no longer accept a payment channel scheme that lets one you cooperate with a miner to cheat the bartender.
Fortunately, Jeremy Spilman proposed a better way that would not let you cheat the bartender.
First, you and the bartender perform this ritual:
  1. You get some funds and create a transaction that pays to a 2-of-2 multisig between you and the bartender. You don't broadcast this yet: you just sign it and get its txid.
  2. You create another transaction that spends the above transaction. This transaction (the "backoff") has an nLockTime equal to the closing time of the bar, plus one block. You sign it and give this backoff transaction (but not the above transaction) to the bartender.
  3. The bartender signs the backoff and gives it back to you. It is now valid since it's spending a 2-of-2 of you and the bartender, and both of you have signed the backoff transaction.
  4. Now you broadcast the first transaction onchain. You and the bartender wait for it to be deeply confirmed, then you can start ordering.
The above is probably vaguely familiar to LN users. It's the funding process of payment channels! The first transaction, the one that pays to a 2-of-2 multisig, is the funding transaction that backs the payment channel funds.
So now you start ordering in this way:
  1. For your first drink, you create a transaction spending the funding transaction output and sending the price of the drink to the bartender, with the rest returning to you.
  2. You sign the transaction and pass it to the bartender, who serves your first drink.
  3. For your succeeding drinks, you recreate the same transaction, adding the price of the new drink to the sum that goes to the bartender and reducing the money returned to you. You sign the transaction and give it to the bartender, who serves you your next drink.
  4. At the end:
    • If the bar closing time is reached, the bartender signs the latest transaction, completing the needed 2-of-2 signatures and broadcasting this to the Bitcoin network. Since the backoff transaction is the closing time + 1, it can't get used at closing time.
    • If you decide you want to leave early because your liver is crying, you just tell the bartender to go ahead and close the channel (which the bartender can do at any time by just signing and broadcasting the latest transaction: the bartender won't do that because he or she is hoping you'll stay and drink more).
    • If you ended up just hanging around the bar and never ordering, then at closing time + 1 you broadcast the backoff transaction and get your funds back in full.
Now, even if you pass 50 drinks to Jihan Wu, you can't give him the first transaction (the one which pays for only one drink) and ask him to mine it: it's spending a 2-of-2 and the copy you have only contains your own signature. You need the bartender's signature to make it valid, but he or she sure as hell isn't going to cooperate in something that would lose him or her money, so a signature from the bartender validating old state where he or she gets paid less isn't going to happen.
So, problem solved, right? Right? Okay, let's try it. So you get your funds, put them in a funding tx, get the backoff tx, confirm the funding tx...
Once the funding transaction confirms deeply, the bartender laughs uproariously. He or she summons the bouncers, who surround you menacingly.
"I'm refusing service to you," the bartender says.
"Fine," you say. "I was leaving anyway;" You smirk. "I'll get back my money with the backoff transaction, and posting about your poor service on reddit so you get negative karma, so there!"
"Not so fast," the bartender says. His or her voice chills your bones. It looks like your exploitation of the Satoshi nSequence payment channel is still fresh in his or her mind. "Look at the txid of the funding transaction that got confirmed."
"What about it?" you ask nonchalantly, as you flip open your desktop computer and open a reputable blockchain explorer.
What you see shocks you.
"What the --- the txid is different! You--- you changed my signature?? But how? I put the only copy of my private key in a sealed envelope in a cast-iron box inside a safe buried in the Gobi desert protected by a clan of nomads who have dedicated their lives and their childrens' lives to keeping my private key safe in perpetuity!"
"Didn't you know?" the bartender asks. "The components of the signature are just very large numbers. The sign of one of the signature components can be changed, from positive to negative, or negative to positive, and the signature will remain valid. Anyone can do that, even if they don't know the private key. But because Bitcoin includes the signatures in the transaction when it's generating the txid, this little change also changes the txid." He or she chuckles. "They say they'll fix it by separating the signatures from the transaction body. They're saying that these kinds of signature malleability won't affect transaction ids anymore after they do this, but I bet I can get my good friend Jihan Wu to delay this 'SepSig' plan for a good while yet. Friendly guy, this Jihan Wu, it turns out all I had to do was slip him 51 drinks and he was willing to mine a tx with the signature signs flipped." His or her grin widens. "I'm afraid your backoff transaction won't work anymore, since it spends a txid that is not existent and will never be confirmed. So here's the deal. You pay me 99% of the funds in the funding transaction, in exchange for me signing the transaction that spends with the txid that you see onchain. Refuse, and you lose 100% of the funds and every other HODLer, including me, benefits from the reduction in coin supply. Accept, and you get to keep 1%. I lose nothing if you refuse, so I won't care if you do, but consider the difference of getting zilch vs. getting 1% of your funds." His or her eyes glow. "GENUFLECT RIGHT NOW."
Lesson learned?

CLTV-protected Spilman Channels

Using CLTV for the backoff branch.
This variation is simply Spilman channels, but with the backoff transaction replaced with a backoff branch in the SCRIPT you pay to. It only became possible after OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY (CLTV) was enabled in 2015.
Now as we saw in the Spilman Channels discussion, transaction malleability means that any pre-signed offchain transaction can easily be invalidated by flipping the sign of the signature of the funding transaction while the funding transaction is not yet confirmed.
This can be avoided by simply putting any special requirements into an explicit branch of the Bitcoin SCRIPT. Now, the backoff branch is supposed to create a maximum lifetime for the payment channel, and prior to the introduction of OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY this could only be done by having a pre-signed nLockTime transaction.
With CLTV, however, we can now make the branches explicit in the SCRIPT that the funding transaction pays to.
Instead of paying to a 2-of-2 in order to set up the funding transaction, you pay to a SCRIPT which is basically "2-of-2, OR this singlesig after a specified lock time".
With this, there is no backoff transaction that is pre-signed and which refers to a specific txid. Instead, you can create the backoff transaction later, using whatever txid the funding transaction ends up being confirmed under. Since the funding transaction is immutable once confirmed, it is no longer possible to change the txid afterwards.

Todd Micropayment Networks

The old hub-spoke model (that isn't how LN today actually works).
One of the more direct predecessors of the Lightning Network was the hub-spoke model discussed by Peter Todd. In this model, instead of payers directly having channels to payees, payers and payees connect to a central hub server. This allows any payer to pay any payee, using the same channel for every payee on the hub. Similarly, this allows any payee to receive from any payer, using the same channel.
Remember from the above Spilman example? When you open a channel to the bartender, you have to wait around for the funding tx to confirm. This will take an hour at best. Now consider that you have to make channels for everyone you want to pay to. That's not very scalable.
So the Todd hub-spoke model has a central "clearing house" that transport money from payers to payees. The "Moonbeam" project takes this model. Of course, this reveals to the hub who the payer and payee are, and thus the hub can potentially censor transactions. Generally, though, it was considered that a hub would more efficiently censor by just not maintaining a channel with the payer or payee that it wants to censor (since the money it owned in the channel would just be locked uselessly if the hub won't process payments to/from the censored user).
In any case, the ability of the central hub to monitor payments means that it can surveill the payer and payee, and then sell this private transactional data to third parties. This loss of privacy would be intolerable today.
Peter Todd also proposed that there might be multiple hubs that could transport funds to each other on behalf of their users, providing somewhat better privacy.
Another point of note is that at the time such networks were proposed, only unidirectional (Spilman) channels were available. Thus, while one could be a payer, or payee, you would have to use separate channels for your income versus for your spending. Worse, if you wanted to transfer money from your income channel to your spending channel, you had to close both and reshuffle the money between them, both onchain activities.

Poon-Dryja Lightning Network

Bidirectional two-participant channels.
The Poon-Dryja channel mechanism has two important properties:
Both the original Satoshi and the two Spilman variants are unidirectional: there is a payer and a payee, and if the payee wants to do a refund, or wants to pay for a different service or product the payer is providing, then they can't use the same unidirectional channel.
The Poon-Dryjam mechanism allows channels, however, to be bidirectional instead: you are not a payer or a payee on the channel, you can receive or send at any time as long as both you and the channel counterparty are online.
Further, unlike either of the Spilman variants, there is no time limit for the lifetime of a channel. Instead, you can keep the channel open for as long as you want.
Both properties, together, form a very powerful scaling property that I believe most people have not appreciated. With unidirectional channels, as mentioned before, if you both earn and spend over the same network of payment channels, you would have separate channels for earning and spending. You would then need to perform onchain operations to "reverse" the directions of your channels periodically. Secondly, since Spilman channels have a fixed lifetime, even if you never used either channel, you would have to periodically "refresh" it by closing it and reopening.
With bidirectional, indefinite-lifetime channels, you may instead open some channels when you first begin managing your own money, then close them only after your lawyers have executed your last will and testament on how the money in your channels get divided up to your heirs: that's just two onchain transactions in your entire lifetime. That is the potentially very powerful scaling property that bidirectional, indefinite-lifetime channels allow.
I won't discuss the transaction structure needed for Poon-Dryja bidirectional channels --- it's complicated and you can easily get explanations with cute graphics elsewhere.
There is a weakness of Poon-Dryja that people tend to gloss over (because it was fixed very well by RustyReddit):
Another thing I want to emphasize is that while the Lightning Network paper and many of the earlier presentations developed from the old Peter Todd hub-and-spoke model, the modern Lightning Network takes the logical conclusion of removing a strict separation between "hubs" and "spokes". Any node on the Lightning Network can very well work as a hub for any other node. Thus, while you might operate as "mostly a payer", "mostly a forwarding node", "mostly a payee", you still end up being at least partially a forwarding node ("hub") on the network, at least part of the time. This greatly reduces the problems of privacy inherent in having only a few hub nodes: forwarding nodes cannot get significantly useful data from the payments passing through them, because the distance between the payer and the payee can be so large that it would be likely that the ultimate payer and the ultimate payee could be anyone on the Lightning Network.
Lessons learned?

Future

After LN, there's also the Decker-Wattenhofer Duplex Micropayment Channels (DMC). This post is long enough as-is, LOL. But for now, it uses a novel "decrementing nSequence channel", using the new relative-timelock semantics of nSequence (not the broken one originally by Satoshi). It actually uses multiple such "decrementing nSequence" constructs, terminating in a pair of Spilman channels, one in both directions (thus "duplex"). Maybe I'll discuss it some other time.
The realization that channel constructions could actually hold more channel constructions inside them (the way the Decker-Wattenhofer puts a pair of Spilman channels inside a series of "decrementing nSequence channels") lead to the further thought behind Burchert-Decker-Wattenhofer channel factories. Basically, you could host multiple two-participant channel constructs inside a larger multiparticipant "channel" construct (i.e. host multiple channels inside a factory).
Further, we have the Decker-Russell-Osuntokun or "eltoo" construction. I'd argue that this is "nSequence done right". I'll write more about this later, because this post is long enough.
Lessons learned?
submitted by almkglor to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How To Send Bitcoins From Coinbase.com

How To Send Bitcoins From Coinbase.com
Coinbase is one of the biggest and well-known bitcoin exchanges and it is considered to be the most suitable platform for beginners to start use with the Bitcoins.
In this blog we are going to discuss how to send their Bitcoin from Coinbase to other wallets or to different exchanges.

How To Send Bitcoins From Coinbase.com

Step 1: Send Bitcoin from Coinbase
Open your coinbase account
Hope you already purchased some bitcoins
Choose the platform whether you want to use coinbase or coinbase pro
Next step initiate the transfer from Coinbase

How To Send Bitcoins From Coinbase.com

To initiate the transfer from your basic Coinbase account:

Click on to the Coinbase “Accounts” button at the top of the page to see a list of all of your wallets.
How To Send Bitcoins From Coinbase.com
Click on “BTC Wallet” and press“Send”.
Clicking on this will open up a larger menu that will allow you to provide further details about the transfer.
To Initiate the transfer from Coinbase Pro
In the Coinbase Pro account hit the “withdraw” button that you’ll find on the left side of your screen.
A small menu will pop up with a “Currency Type” drop-down menu bar.
Click on the drop-down portion and select BTC.
This will further expand the menu so that you can enter the details of your transaction.
Now input your transaction details, and move onto the next step!
Step 2: Find your Recipient Public Address

How To Send Bitcoins From Coinbase.com
To find your recipient's public address ,first of all you need to input your wallet address where you are going to be receiving your Bitcoin from Coinbase.
Let's find below how to send Bitcoin from Coinbase to Binance, Bittrex, Kraken, Poloniex, Electrum, Blockchain.com, or other platforms.
How to Send Bitcoin from Coinbase to Binance

How To Send Bitcoins From Coinbase.com
Click on the tab that resembles a person’s head and shoulders.
A drop-down menu will appear. Click on the “estimated value” button and you will be brought to a page that will list all of the coins you can exchange on the platform as well as your balance for each.
Find the BTC line and click on “deposit” on the right side.
Now you will land on a page which shows your transaction history and a wallet address, in that click on the “copy address”.
Next go back to your Coinbase account and to the transfer menu you opened earlier.
In the recipient/destination section, paste the address you just copied and insert the amount of Bitcoin you want to send in the “Amount” box.
Press “continue” and you will then be asked to confirm this information.
Carefully check everything looks right, and confirm the transfer.
How to Transfer Bitcoin from Coinbase to Bittrex

How To Send Bitcoins From Coinbase.com
Click on “wallets” in the top right corner of the Bittrex website.
You will find now a list of all coins that can be exchanged on the platform and the amount that you are currently holding..
Find the Bitcoin section by either navigating through the list or by searching for BTC in the search bar that is located above the list of cryptocurrencies.
Once you have found the Bitcoin bar, click on the small green circle on its left side and this will show you your Bitcoin deposit address.
Click on the clipboard icon located right next to your BTC address and this will copy your wallet address on clipboard.
Return to your Coinbase account and paste this address into the recipient/destination bar.
Then, add the amount of Bitcoin you want to transfer, continue, and confirm the transaction.
How to Transfer Bitcoin from Coinbase to Kraken
How To Send Bitcoins From Coinbase.com
Click on the funding button in the kraken dashboard.
On the left side of the page you find all the available cryptocurrencies on the exchange.
Click on the bitcoins and scroll down the page to find your Bitcoin deposit address. If you have not found the address then, click “generate new address”.
Copy and Paste this address into the recipient bar, and then add the amount of Bitcoin you want to transfer, continue, and confirm the transaction.
How to Transfer Bitcoin from Coinbase to Poloniex

How To Send Bitcoins From Coinbase.com

In the poloniex dashboard you find the “balances” tab., in that click on “deposits and withdrawals” tab.
Now you will be redirected to a page which has a list of all cryptocurrencies.
Click the deposit button on the right side of the bitcoin section.
Now you get your wallet address, copy that address and paste it into the recipient/destination bar.
Next add the amount of Bitcoin you want to transfer, continue, and confirm the transaction.
How to send Bitcoin from Coinbase to your Electrum Wallet

How To Send Bitcoins From Coinbase.com
When compared to all other platforms, sending the Bitcoin from your Coinbase account to your Electrum wallet is very easy.
Initial process opens up the Electrum software.
Click on the “receive” tab which is located next to the send and history tab, where you’ll find your Bitcoin public address.
Copy this address by clicking on the small clipboard icon next to the wallet address.
Once copied, return back to your Coinbase account and paste this address into the recipient bar.
Then, enter the amount of Bitcoin you want to transfer to your Electrum wallet, continue, and confirm the transaction.
How to transfer Bitcoin from Coinbase to your Blockchain.com Wallet
To send Bitcoin from Coinbase to Your Blockchain.com wallet:
How To Send Bitcoins From Coinbase.com

First visit the dashboard of your Blockchain.com wallet.
In the top of the page, find and click the “request” button.
Request button will show your Bitcoin wallet address.
Click the “copy” button next to the wallet address, and return back to your Coinbase account.
Paste the address into the recipient bar, enter the amount of Bitcoin you want to transfer, continue, and confirm the transaction.
Step 3: Follow up with your Transfer
Following the above steps, you will be able to send out your Bitcoins from your coinbase account.
Next step you have to watch your transaction.
How to watch your Transaction from Coinbase
Randomly check your transaction history on Coinbase
Click on the most recent transaction on the list of transactions on your Coinbase dashboard.
This will clearly show you more details about your transfers.
Click on the link that says “view transaction” and you will be brought to a blockchain explorer, where you will find all the details of your transaction, including its status and the number of confirmations that took place.
How to watch your Transaction from the recipient Exchange/Wallet
You can also view about your transaction exchange platform, as such the
Deposit section of the Binance exchange, the funding section of the Kraken exchange, the history section of the Poloniex exchange, the Bitcoin transactions section of the Blockchain.com website
The history section of your Electrum wallet, which can be viewed when you click on any of your transactions in the “history” tab
The wallets section of the Bittrex exchange when you click on Bitcoin
How long does it take to send bitcoin from Coinbase?
The bitcoin transfer takes only two-minutes., but sometimes it is as late as hours after your transfer. The delay happens because you will need to be verified by miners, and also it depends upon the speed of the network, this could be either a slow or fast process.
Wallets like Electrum only request one confirmation, which is much faster than using an exchange like Kraken, which will require six confirmations.
When a Bitcoin transaction is sent out, it has to wait until it is ready to be verified by a miner. Once it is ready for verification and has been shown on the network, it will receive one confirmation.
Each new transaction added to the network will add another confirmation to yours and some platforms prefer waiting for additional confirmations to make sure that everything is correct before they add your funds to your wallet.
If you have any queries then ask our experts at https://stealthaccshop.com or feel free to call us at +1(480) 637-7566 or have a chat with us at SKYPE/Mail [email protected]
submitted by stealthaccshop to u/stealthaccshop [link] [comments]

I'm trying to put together a list of what's coming out this year. Have this very simple list so far. Anyone care to add anything or suggest some better dates?

Latest News (most recent first) - Instant channels enable safe Lightning payments with unconfirmed funding Beta - Feb 10, 2019 - Voyager, New trading app from Uber & E-Trade execs announce launch date - Feb 9, 2019 - bumi/blockstream_satellite ruby gem for the Blockstream Satellite API - Feb 8, 2019 - New Zap Desktop 0.3.4 is out. New features, massive performance - Feb 8, 2019 - New release: @lightning desktop app v0.4.0-alpha - Feb 8, 2019 - valerio-vaccaro/Liquid-dashboard - Feb 7, 2019 - Japanese SBI Holdings will allow trading of coins - March 2019 - lnd v0.5.2-beta released - Feb 6, 2019 - Koala studios launches online LN gaming platform - Feb 6, 2019 - Independent Reserve has become the first #crypto exchange in Australia to be insured, with coverage underwritten by Lloyd's of London. - Feb 6, 2019 - Coinbase announces BTC support for their mobile (keep your own keys) wallet - Feb 6, 2019 - Blockstream published a new open source Proof of Reserves tool. - Feb 5, 2019 - RTL release v0.1.14-alpha - Feb 5, 2019 - dr-orlovsky/typhon-spec spec for new trestles side chain published - Feb 5, 2019 - Payment requests coming soon to BTCPay. - Feb 5th, 2019 - Kraken Acquires Futures Startup In Deal Worth At Least $100 Million - Feb 5th, 2019 - Next Blockchain cruise scheduled for June 9-13 - Feb 4, 2019 - Work on a GoTenna plugin to Electrum wallet in progress - Feb 4, 2019 - Bitcoin Candy Dispensers being open sourced - Feb 4, 2019 - New release of JoinMarket v0.5.3 - Feb 4, 2019 - Prime Trust won’t charge its clients to custody digital assets any longer. - Feb 4, 2019 - nodogsplash/nodogsplash wifi access using LN - Feb 3, 2019 - @tippin_me Receive tips using Lightning Network adds message feature - Feb 3, 2019 - Bitcoin-for-Taxes Bill in NH Unanimously Approved by House Subcommittee - Feb 3, 2019 - Full support for native segwit merged into bitcoinj - Feb 3, 2019 - Bitfury is partnering with financial services firm Final Frontier! - Feb 2, 2019 - Now you can open #LightningNetwork channels in @LightningJoule - Feb 2, 2019 - Integrating Blockstream’s Liquid payments on SideShift AI - Feb 1, 2019 - Wyoming legislature passes bill to recognize cryptocurrency as money - Feb 1, 2019 - Casa is open sourcing the code for the Casa Node - Feb 1, 2019 - Casa Browser Extension released - v0.5.2-beta-rc6 of lnd, full release getting very close now - Feb 1, 2019 - Tallycoin adds subscriptions and paywall features in bid to rival Patreon - Jan 31, 2019 - Static channel backup PR merged into LN - Jan 31, 2019 - The NYDFS grants another Bitlicense to ATM operator - Jan 31, 2019 - @pwuille currently proposing the “MiniScript” language to describe BTC output locking conditions for practical composition - Jan 31, 2019 - Fidelity is in the “final testing” phase for its new digital asset business - Jan 31, 2019 - Hardware wallet PR #109 just got merged so that @Trezor no longer requires user interaction for PIN - Jan 31, 2019 - CBOE, VanEck & SolidX filed a new & improved bitcoin ETF proposal. - Jan 31, 2019 - Casa Node code is now open sourced - Jan 31, 2019 - Next Bitoin halving in roughly 497 days - Jan 31, 2019 - BTCPay released 1.0.3.53 - Jan 31, 2019 - @binance now lets users purchase cryptos using Visa and Mastercard credit. - Jan 31, 2019 - Bitfury to Launch Bitcoin Operations in Paraguay - Jan 31, 2019 - Coinbase introduces very generous affiliate program - Jan 30, 2019 - DOJO Trusted Node bitcoin full node. Coming Early 2019 - Jan 30, 2019 - FastBitcoins.com Enables Cash-for-Bitcoin Exchange Via the Lightning Network - Jan 30, 2019 - TD Ameritrade says clients want cryptocurrency investment options - company plans major announcement in 'first half of 2019' - Jan 30, 2019 - Storage component of Fidelity's @DigitalAssets live, with some assets under management, @nikhileshde - Jan 29, 2019 - lightning mainnet has reached 600 BTC capacity - Jan 29, 2019 - Drivechain shows picture of Grin side chain and suggests might be ready in 2 month - Jan 29, 2019 - Lightning labs iOS neutrino wallet in testing stage now - Jan 29, 2019 - Aliant offering cryptocurrency processing free-of-charge - Jan 29, 2019 - Chainstone’s Regulator product to manage assets on the way - Jan 29, 2019 - Fidelity Investments’ new crypto custody service may officially launch in March. - Jan 29, 2019 - Gemini's becomes FIRST crypto EXCHANGE and CUSTODIAN to complete a SOC 2 Review by Deloitte - Jan 29, 2019 - Iran has lifted the ban on Bitcoin and cryptocurrency - Jan 29, 2019 - Confidential Transactions being added into Litecoin announcement - Jan 28, 2019 - http://FastBitcoins.com Enables Cash-for-Bitcoin Exchange Via the Lightning Network - Jan 28, 2019 - Germany’s largest online food delivery platform now accepts btc - Jan 27, 2019 - Launching a Bitcoin Developers School in Switzerland - Jan 27, 2019 - RTL release v0.1.13-alpha Lightning Build repository released - Jan 27, 2019 - The first pay-per-page fantasy novel available to Lightning Network. - Jan 27, 2019 - Numerous tools become available to write messages transmitted with Blockstream Satellite - Jan 26, 2019; - BTCPay 1.0.3.47 released - Jan 26,2019 - WordPress + WooCommerce + BTCPay Plugin is now live - Jan 25, 2019 - Juan Guaido has been promoting #Bitcoin since 2014 is new interim president of Venezuela - Jan 25, 2019 - Morgan Creek funds @RealBlocks - Jan 25, 2019 - Coinbase integrates TurboTax - Jan 25, 2019 - Robinhood received Bitlicense - Jan 25, 2019 - Anchor Labs launches custody - Jan 25, 2019 - NYSE Arca files w/ @BitwiseInvest for BTC ETF approval - Jan 25, 2019 - South Korea, Seoul, Busan & Jeju Island currently working to create pro crypto economic zones. - Jan 25, 2019 - valerio-vaccaro/Liquid-dashboard - Jan 25, 2019 - Bermuda to launch crypto friendly bank - Jan 25, 2019 - Mobile Bitcoin Wallet BRD Raises $15 Million, Plans for Expansion in Asia - Jan 25, 2019 - BullBitcoin rolling out alpha access of platform - Jan 25, 2019 - Electrum Wallet Release 3.3.3 - Jan 25, 2019 - Bitrefill, purchase Bitcoin and have it delivered directly over LN - Jan 25, 2019 - South Korean crypto exchange Bithumb looking to go public in USA - Jan 24, 2019 - Bitcoin Exchanges Don’t Need Money Transmitter Licenses in Pennsylvania - Jan 24, 2019 - US; New Hampshire Bill Aims to Legalize Bitcoin for State Payments in 2020 - Jan 24, 2019 - Robinhood, LibertyX Receive Licenses from New York Regulators - Jan 24, 2019 - Bakkt Bitcoin futures contract details released - Jan 24, 2019 - Blockstream CryptoFeed V3 now includes 30+ venues and 200M+ updates per day - Jan 24, 2019 - Binance Jersey – The Latest Binance European Exchange - Jan 2019
Commit Activity
Nodes and Market Dominance
Bitcoin
Financial
Lightning:
ASIC Miners:
Will update this section when I hear new developments
Wallets:
Hardware wallets:
LN
LN Apps:
LN Extensions / Launchers
LN Desktop wallets:
LN Mobile wallets:
LN Network:
LN Nodes:
LN Plugins:
LN Services:
Liquid Network
Rgulatory:
Exchanges:
Payments:
Please comment if you have any ideas on dates. Many of these dates are placeholders waiting for me to update. If you comment then I will update the post.
submitted by kolinHall to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

TRON new comer information. How to buy, exchange, and store TRON and other FAQ's.

Here are some FAQ's for anyone that is new to TRON and would like to learn more about the project. For some more information visit our wiki page or click here.
What is TRON?
From the white paper:
TRON is a world-leading blockchain-based decentralized protocol that aims to construct a worldwide free content entertainment system with the blockchain and distributed storage technology. The protocol allows each user to freely publish, store and own data, and in the decentralized autonomous form, decides the distribution, subscription, and push of contents and enables content creators by releasing, circulating and dealing with digital assets, thus forming a decentralized content entertainment ecosystem.
What does that mean?
The root issue of the internet is that everything is hosted on central data centers of Facebook, Amazon, Netfilx, and Google plus some other "small" companies like drop box and such. This is a huge issue, because when you use these services that are "free" you are really paying by selling all the information you provide them in which tell sell to other people extending from anything you type to pictures and videos you upload. Additionally, especially with net neutrality being repealed, large companies will be able to prioritize themselves over competition, forcing you to pay a premium for your entertainment.
TRON is a solution to that because it is aiming to be the foundation of a entirely new internet protocol. Data will be stored in fragments around the network that is provided by miners, truly decentralizing the internet. Its a self sustaining economy in which everyone provides a bit of storage to the network in reward for TRX and in turn that TRX is used by you consuming entertainment. In this way entertainment providers can realistically generate reliable income based off the popularity of their content.
Why is development taking so long?
The web right now is built with whats called HTTP protocol and pre-made commands and functions already exist for developers to use. Because TRON's goal is to completely revolutionize the outdated HTTP protocol, much of the coding has to be done from scratch.
Where can I buy TRON?
Currently there are very limited places to directly buy TRON directly with FIAT money (government issued money). It can however be exchanged in a number of websites for bitcoin. Here are the steps you need to take:
1) Create an account at an exchange where you can purchase bitcoin or ethereum using fiat currencies. Buy bitcoin or ethereum. Here is a website that can help you find such exchange: https://www.buybitcoinworldwide.com (a side note is that ethereum usually transfers faster and has cheaper fees. You will have to transfer your bitcoin or ethereum in step 4)
2) Create an account at an exchange that will exchange bitcoin/ethereum to TRX. Any of the exchanges listed in the right info bar or bottom of this post will work. The exchange with the highest volume of TRON is binance.com and will be used in this example.
3) In Binance, locate your online wallet by dropping down the funds tab in the top right and select deposit withdraw. If you bought bitcoin find the bitcoin section under coins and click deposit. Copy this address as it will give you the address you will send your bitcoin to. The process is the same for Ethereum.
4) Using the exchange you created in step 1 to originally buy your bitcoin/ethereum, locate your wallet there, and select the withdraw button to send your bitcoin or ethereum to binance using the address you copied.
5) After a while your bitcoin/ethereum will show up in binance in which you can exchange it for TRX.
Where do I store my TRON?
It is not recommended to store your funds long term on an exchange as exchanges can be hacked, be shut down, or do wallet maintenance. If you do, it is recommended you use 2 factor authentication. Currently there is not an official TRON wallet, save keeping it on their website, but hardware wallets are usually the best way to store your crypto long term. Our wiki page has a number of options you can use. (https://www.reddit.com/Tronix/wiki/wallets)
Social Links: Telegram: https://t.me/joinchat/GW8P8EK7dhkzOwFmxnuwqA
Discord: https://discord.gg/ur9nKTe
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tronfoundation/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Tronfoundation
Exchanges: Coinnest, Binance, Liqui, Gatecoin, Coinegg, HitBTC, Mercatox, Gate.io, CoolCoin, EtherDelta, Bit-Z, Qryptos
submitted by pochacod to Tronix [link] [comments]

A Beginners Guide to Bitcoin, Blockchain & Cryptocurrency

As cryptocurrency, and blockchain technology become more abundant throughout our society, it’s important to understand the inner workings of this technology, especially if you plan to use cryptocurrency as an investment vehicle. If you’re new to the crypto-sphere, learning about Bitcoin makes it much easier to understand other cryptocurrencies as many other altcoins' technologies are borrowed directly from Bitcoin.
Bitcoin is one of those things that you look into only to discover you have more questions than answers, and right as you’re starting to wrap your head around the technology; you discover the fact that Bitcoin has six other variants (forks), the amount of politics at hand, or that there are over a thousand different cryptocurrencies just as complex if not even more complex than Bitcoin.
We are currently in the infancy of blockchain technology and the effects of this technology will be as profound as the internet. This isn’t something that’s just going to fade away into history as you may have been led to believe. I believe this is something that will become an integral part of our society, eventually embedded within our technology. If you’re a crypto-newbie, be glad that you're relatively early to the industry. I hope this post will put you on the fast-track to understanding Bitcoin, blockchain, and how a large percentage of cryptocurrencies work.

Community Terminology

Altcoin: Short for alternative coin. There are over 1,000 different cryptocurrencies. You’re probably most familiar with Bitcoin. Anything that isn’t Bitcoin is generally referred to as an altcoin.
HODL: Misspelling of hold. Dank meme accidentally started by this dude. Hodlers are much more interested in long term gains rather than playing the risky game of trying to time the market.
TO THE MOON: When a cryptocurrency’s price rapidly increases. A major price spike of over 1,000% can look like it’s blasting off to the moon. Just be sure you’re wearing your seatbelt when it comes crashing down.
FUD: Fear. Uncertainty. Doubt.
FOMO: Fear of missing out.
Bull Run: Financial term used to describe a rising market.
Bear Run: Financial term used to describe a falling market.

What Is Bitcoin?

Bitcoin (BTC) is a decentralized digital currency that uses cryptography to secure and ensure validity of transactions within the network. Hence the term crypto-currency. Decentralization is a key aspect of Bitcoin. There is no CEO of Bitcoin or central authoritative government in control of the currency. The currency is ran and operated by the people, for the people. One of the main development teams behind Bitcoin is blockstream.
Bitcoin is a product of blockchain technology. Blockchain is what allows for the security and decentralization of Bitcoin. To understand Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, you must understand to some degree, blockchain. This can get extremely technical the further down the rabbit hole you go, and because this is technically a beginners guide, I’m going to try and simplify to the best of my ability and provide resources for further technical reading.

A Brief History

Bitcoin was created by Satoshi Nakamoto. The identity of Nakamoto is unknown. The idea of Bitcoin was first introduced in 2008 when Nakamoto released the Bitcoin white paper - Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System. Later, in January 2009, Nakamoto announced the Bitcoin software and the Bitcoin network officially began.
I should also mention that the smallest unit of a Bitcoin is called a Satoshi. 1 BTC = 100,000,000 Satoshis. When purchasing Bitcoin, you don’t actually need to purchase an entire coin. Bitcoin is divisible, so you can purchase any amount greater than 1 Satoshi (0.00000001 BTC).

What Is Blockchain?

Blockchain is a distributed ledger, a distributed collection of accounts. What is being accounted for depends on the use-case of the blockchain itself. In the case of Bitcoin, what is being accounted for is financial transactions.
The first block in a blockchain is referred to as the genesis block. A block is an aggregate of data. Blocks are also discovered through a process known as mining (more on this later). Each block is cryptographically signed by the previous block in the chain and visualizing this would look something akin to a chain of blocks, hence the term, blockchain.
For more information regarding blockchain I’ve provided more resouces below:

What is Bitcoin Mining

Bitcoin mining is one solution to the double spend problem. Bitcoin mining is how transactions are placed into blocks and added onto the blockchain. This is done to ensure proof of work, where computational power is staked in order to solve what is essentially a puzzle. If you solve the puzzle correctly, you are rewarded Bitcoin in the form of transaction fees, and the predetermined block reward. The Bitcoin given during a block reward is also the only way new Bitcoin can be introduced into the economy. With a halving event occurring roughly every 4 years, it is estimated that the last Bitcoin block will be mined in the year 2,140. (See What is Block Reward below for more info).
Mining is one of those aspects of Bitcoin that can get extremely technical and more complicated the further down the rabbit hole you go. An entire website could be created (and many have) dedicated solely to information regarding Bitcoin mining. The small paragraph above is meant to briefly expose you to the function of mining and the role it plays within the ecosystem. It doesn’t even scratch the surface regarding the topic.

How do you Purchase Bitcoin?

The most popular way to purchase Bitcoin through is through an online exchange where you trade fiat (your national currency) for Bitcoin.
Popular exchanges include:
  • Coinbase
  • Kraken
  • Cex
  • Gemini
There’s tons of different exchanges. Just make sure you find one that supports your national currency.

Volatility

Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies are EXTREMELY volatile. Swings of 30% or more within a few days is not unheard of. Understand that there is always inherent risks with any investment. Cryptocurrencies especially. Only invest what you’re willing to lose.

Transaction & Network Fees

Transacting on the Bitcoin network is not free. Every purchase or transfer of Bitcoin will cost X amount of BTC depending on how congested the network is. These fees are given to miners as apart of the block reward.
Late 2017 when Bitcoin got up to $20,000USD, the average network fee was ~$50. Currently, at the time of writing this, the average network fee is $1.46. This data is available in real-time on BitInfoCharts.

Security

In this new era of money, there is no central bank or government you can go to in need of assistance. This means the responsibility of your money falls 100% into your hands. That being said, the security regarding your cryptocurrency should be impeccable. The anonymity provided by cryptocurrencies alone makes you a valuable target to hackers and scammers. Below I’ve detailed out best practices regarding securing your cryptocurrency.

Two-Factor Authentication (2FA)

Two-factor authentication is a second way of authenticating your identity upon signing in to an account. Most cryptocurrency related software/websites will offer or require some form of 2FA. Upon creation of any crypto-related account find the Security section and enable 2FA.

SMS Authentication

The most basic form of 2FA which you are probably most familiar with. This form of authentication sends a text message to your smartphone with a special code that will allow access to your account upon entry. Note that this is not the safest form of 2FA as you may still be vulnerable to what is known as a SIM swap attack. SIM swapping is a social engineering method in which an attacker will call up your phone carrier, impersonating you, in attempt to re-activate your SIM card on his/her device. Once the attacker has access to your SIM card he/she now has access to your text messages which can then be used to access your online accounts. You can prevent this by using an authenticator such as Google Authenticator.

Authenticator

The use of an authenticator is the safest form of 2FA. An authenticator is installed on a seperate device and enabling it requires you input an ever changing six digit code in order to access your account. I recommend using Google Authenticator.
If a website has the option to enable an authenticator, it will give you a QR code and secret key. Use Google Authenticator to scan the QR code. The secret key consists of a random string of numbers and letters. Write this down on a seperate sheet of paper and do not store it on a digital device.
Once Google Authenticator has been enabled, every time you sign into your account, you will have to input a six-digit code that looks similar to this. If you happen to lose or damage the device you have Google Authenticator installed on, you will be locked out of your account UNLESS you have access to the secret key (which you should have written down).

Hardware Wallets

A wallet is what you store Bitcoin and cryptocurrency on. I’ll provide resources on the different type of wallets later but I want to emphasize the use of a hardware wallet (aka cold storage).
Hardware wallets are the safest way of storing cryptocurrency because it allows for your crypto to be kept offline in a physical device. After purchasing crypto via an exchange, I recommend transferring it to cold storage. The most popular hardware wallets include the Ledger Nano S, and Trezor.
Hardware wallets come with a special key so that if it gets lost or damaged, you can recover your crypto. I recommend keeping your recovery key as well as any other sensitive information in a safety deposit box.
I know this all may seem a bit manic, but it is important you take the necessary security precautions in order to ensure the safety & longevity of your cryptocurrency.

Technical Aspects of Bitcoin

TL;DR
  • Address: What you send Bitcoin to.
  • Wallet: Where you store your Bitcoin
  • Max Supply: 21 million
  • Block Time: ~10 minutes
  • Block Size: 1-2 MB
  • Block Reward: BTC reward received from mining.

What is a Bitcoin Address?

A Bitcoin address is what you send Bitcoin to. If you want to receive Bitcoin you’d give someone your Bitcoin address. Think of a Bitcoin address as an email address for money.

What is a Bitcoin Wallet?

As the title implies, a Bitcoin wallet is anything that can store Bitcoin. There are many different types of wallets including paper wallets, software wallets and hardware wallets. It is generally advised NOT to keep cryptocurrency on an exchange, as exchanges are prone to hacks (see Mt. Gox hack).
My preferred method of storing cryptocurrency is using a hardware wallet such as the Ledger Nano S or Trezor. These allow you to keep your crypto offline in physical form and as a result, much more safe from hacks. Paper wallets also allow for this but have less functionality in my opinion.
After I make crypto purchases, I transfer it to my Ledger Nano S and keep that in a safe at home. Hardware wallets also come with a special key so that if it gets lost or damaged, you can recover your crypto. I recommend keeping your recovery key in a safety deposit box.

What is Bitcoins Max Supply?

The max supply of Bitcoin is 21 million. The only way new Bitcoins can be introduced into the economy are through block rewards which are given after successfully mining a block (more on this later).

What is Bitcoins Block Time?

The average time in which blocks are created is called block time. For Bitcoin, the block time is ~10 minutes, meaning, 10 minutes is the minimum amount of time it will take for a Bitcoin transaction to be processed. Note that transactions on the Bitcoin network can take much longer depending on how congested the network is. Having to wait a few hours or even a few days in some instances for a transaction to clear is not unheard of.
Other cryptocurrencies will have different block times. For example, Ethereum has a block time of ~15 seconds.
For more information on how block time works, Prabath Siriwardena has a good block post on this subject which can be found here.

What is Bitcoins Block Size?

There is a limit to how large blocks can be. In the early days of Bitcoin, the block size was 36MB, but in 2010 this was reduced to 1 MB in order to prevent distributed denial of service attacks (DDoS), spam, and other malicious use on the blockchain. Nowadays, blocks are routinely in excess of 1MB, with the largest to date being somewhere around 2.1 MB.
There is much debate amongst the community on whether or not to increase Bitcoin’s block size limit to account for ever-increasing network demand. A larger block size would allow for more transactions to be processed. The con argument to this is that decentralization would be at risk as mining would become more centralized. As a result of this debate, on August 1, 2017, Bitcoin underwent a hard-fork and Bitcoin Cash was created which has a block size limit of 8 MB. Note that these are two completely different blockchains and sending Bitcoin to a Bitcoin Cash wallet (or vice versa) will result in a failed transaction.
Update: As of May 15th, 2018 Bitcoin Cash underwent another hard fork and the block size has increased to 32 MB.
On the topic of Bitcoin vs Bitcoin Cash and which cryptocurrency is better, I’ll let you do your own research and make that decision for yourself. It is good to know that this is a debated topic within the community and example of the politics that manifest within the space. Now if you see community members arguing about this topic, you’ll at least have a bit of background to the issue.

What is Block Reward?

Block reward is the BTC you receive after discovering a block. Blocks are discovered through a process called mining. The only way new BTC can be added to the economy is through block rewards and the block reward is halved every 210,000 blocks (approximately every 4 years). Halving events are done to limit the supply of Bitcoin. At the inception of Bitcoin, the block reward was 50BTC. At the time of writing this, the block reward is 12.5BTC. Halving events will continue to occur until the amount of new Bitcoin introduced into the economy becomes less than 1 Satoshi. This is expected to happen around the year 2,140. All 21 million Bitcoins will have been mined. Once all Bitcoins have been mined, the block reward will only consist of transaction fees.

Technical Aspects Continued

Understanding Nodes

Straight from the Bitcoin.it wiki
Any computer that connects to the Bitcoin network is called a node. Nodes that fully verify all of the rules of Bitcoin are called full nodes.
In other words, full nodes are what verify the Bitcoin blockchain and they play a crucial role in maintaining the decentralized network. Full nodes store the entirety of the blockchain and validate transactions. Anyone can participate in the Bitcoin network and run a full node. Bitcoin.org has information on how to set up a full node. Running a full node also gives you wallet capabilities and the ability to query the blockchain.
For more information on Bitcoin nodes, see Andreas Antonopoulos’s Q&A on the role of nodes.

What is a Fork?

A fork is a divergence in a blockchain. Since Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer network, there’s an overall set of rules (protocol) in which participants within the network must abide by. These rules are put in place to form network consensus. Forks occur when implementations must be made to the blockchain or if there is disagreement amongst the network on how consensus should be achieved.

Soft Fork vs Hard Fork

The difference between soft and hard forks lies in compatibility. Soft forks are backwards compatible, hard forks are not. Think of soft forks as software upgrades to the blockchain, whereas hard forks are a software upgrade that warrant a completely new blockchain.
During a soft fork, miners and nodes upgrade their software to support new consensus rules. Nodes that do not upgrade will still accept the new blockchain.
Examples of Bitcoin soft forks include:
A hard fork can be thought of as the creation of a new blockchain that X percentage of the community decides to migrate too. During a hard fork, miners and nodes upgrade their software to support new consensus rules, Nodes that do not upgrade are invalid and cannot accept the new blockchain.
Examples of Bitcoin hard forks include:
  • Bitcoin Cash
  • Bitcoin Gold
Note that these are completely different blockchains and independent from the Bitcoin blockchain. If you try to send Bitcoin to one of these blockchains, the transaction will fail.

A Case For Bitcoin in a World of Centralization

Our current financial system is centralized, which means the ledger(s) that operate within this centralized system are subjugated to control, manipulation, fraud, and many other negative aspects that come with this system. There are also pros that come with a centralized system, such as the ability to swiftly make decisions. However, at some point, the cons outweigh the pros, and change is needed. What makes Bitcoin so special as opposed to our current financial system is that Bitcoin allows for the decentralized transfer of money. Not one person owns the Bitcoin network, everybody does. Not one person controls Bitcoin, everybody does. A decentralized system in theory removes much of the baggage that comes with a centralized system. Not to say the Bitcoin network doesn’t have its problems (wink wink it does), and there’s much debate amongst the community as to how to go about solving these issues. But even tiny steps are significant steps in the world of blockchain, and I believe Bitcoin will ultimately help to democratize our financial system, whether or not you believe it is here to stay for good.

Final Conclusions

Well that was a lot of words… Anyways I hope this guide was beneficial, especially to you crypto newbies out there. You may have come into this realm not expecting there to be an abundance of information to learn about. I know I didn’t. Bitcoin is only the tip of the iceberg, but now that you have a fundamental understanding of Bitcoin, learning about other cryptocurrencies such as Litecoin, and Ethereum will come more naturally.
Feel free to ask questions below! I’m sure either the community or myself would be happy to answer your questions.
Thanks for reading!

Related Links

Guides

Exchanges

submitted by MrCryptoDude to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Elastos (TICKER: ELA) Assessment

Author's Note:
Elastos was discussed in this group twice, albeit 7 and 9 months ago, respectively. To do the project justice my intention is to give existing and new CryptoMoonShots group followers an update as the overall market has changed considerably and to factor in project-specific developments following the two mentions of Elastos here.

Definitions:
Content Creators and/or Developers: Individuals and enterprises that generate, design, and create digital assets.
Digital Capital: An individuals videos, photos, written text, written or spoken ideas, music, time, and attention
Big Tech: Companies like Alphabet, Facebook, Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Twitter to name a few.

Project Introduction:
The design philosophy of Elastos originated from Rong Chen, a former senior software engineer at Microsoft. Building on his experience at Microsoft, Chen wanted to create a platform in which applications and services are not allowed to access the Internet directly. Without access to the network, malware would not be able to steal user data or attack other services on the Internet. Chen’s vision was subsequently developed into an open-source, lightweight operating system for virtual machines (github.com/Elastos). In 2017, blockchain technology was integrated into Chen’s vision, enabling development of the Elastos Smart Web.

The project is focused on developing a decentralized internet platform where digital assets are owned, distributed, and monetized by Content Creators and/or Developers that own it. To understand this, it is imperative to understand the current internet model (Internet 2.0). Big tech currently owns the internet and everything in it: your videos, your photos, your written text, your ideas, your music, your time, your attention - and the most important in this context - the means of distribution - let's call this Digital Capital. In the current model, Content Creators and/or Developers are forced to distribute their capital through channels owned by Big Tech, which rob creators of their rights and profits.

Elastos is building the boundlessly scalable platform where digital capital can be published, distributed, and monetized by creators while allowing creators and developers to retain their rights. This platform will allow for decentralized applications (Dapps) to operate on a peer-to-peer network with no centralized control. Consumers can access these Dapps via their mobile phones without changing their operating system. The old Internet is a Web of information. If you click a URL, you get data. Elastos is creating a Web of apps. When you click a URL, you get code. The Elastos Web will be a special economic zone where Elastos tokens function as the base currency.

The project is open-source software whose development process has been sponsored by industry giants such as the Tsinghua Science Park, the TD-SCDMA Industrial Alliance and the Foxconn Group for more than 200 million RMB. The project has published more than ten million lines of source code, including four million lines of original source code. The Elastos blockchain utilizes merged mining with Bitcoin, the process by which consensus is reached on both chains simultaneously. In this case, the Bitcoin blockchain works as the parent blockchain to Elastos, with the Elastos chain as its auxiliary blockchain. The mining pools will deploy merged mining code and miners will submit proof of work to both blockchains at the same time. Energy consumption does not increase with merged mining, and will be equal to the energy consumed for mining either alone. Through this mechanism, the Elastos blockchain has an extremely strong guarantee of computing power and will then be able to provide blockchain innovations at a global scale. It makes full use of existing Bitcoin computing resources in addition to being environmentally friendly.

Live Products

Elastos SPV Wallet
Elastos provides an SPV Wallet SDK equipped with a series of wallet-related interfaces to enable users to develop unique wallets that connect to the Elastos blockchain. Sample applications are available now.
Elastos Blockchain Merged Mining
Elastos’ main public blockchain is merged mined with bitcoin, which enables pre-existing bitcoin miners to update their clients to simultaneously mine Elastos without expending excess energy. The merged mining is currently open only to the BTC.com mining pool.
Elastos DID Sidechain Service
Elastos provides a Decentralized ID (DID) Sidechain Service to be used in applications. On the Elastos ecosystem, every user, every device and every app has its own DID and can store any value that is associated with that ID on this sidechain. The DID service paves the way for a more secure and trustable internet, as this allows for seamless interoperability between DApps and IDs are assigned to users from the blockchain rather than having them assigned by a company.
Elastos TV Box
Although Elastos does not sell the TV Box directly, the Elastos Carrier is embedded inside. The Elastos TV Box is presently used for simple features such as remote control in a decentralized peer to peer fashion. In the future, these TV Boxes and many other IoT devices that have Elastos Carrier installed will be capable of running as IPFS nodes for supporting the distributed file storage network for the Elastos ecosystem.
Elastos Dittobox
Any individual can establish a unique dittobox server on a personal computer that integrates ownCloud server and Elastos Carrier. The dittobox server can be installed onto a computer behind the router, and all files stored on the server are accessible from anywhere in the world via the Elastos Carrier network.

Beta Products
Elastos Blockchain PoW + DPoS
Elastos main blockchain will employ a hybrid consensus of PoW + DPoS where the PoW is merged mined with bitcoin and both are used to package blocks while the DPoS nodes are used for signing. This creates a finality in the blocks which will prevent the chain from forking.
Elastos Token Sidechain Service
Elastos DApps utilize this service to generate application-specific native tokens within the Elastos ecosystem. As such, each application can create its own token on demand, and without friction.
Elastos Smart Contract Sidechain Service
Elastos provides a unique sidechain service that is designated to running and executing smart contracts. These smart contracts are compatible with ERC20 and ERC721 tokens, which enables Ethereum DApps to run smoothly within the Elastos ecosystem.
Elastos Hive
Elastos will provide a distributed storage system that apps can utilize to store files, messages in a p2p chat, videos, music, and more.
Elastos Elapay
Elapay is a payment tool that enables payment with ELA. Two types of payments will be supported. The first is “Pay On Order,” which encompasses standard commercial purchases, and will require merchants to integrate Elapay service into their web apps in order to offer users this payment option alongside the likes of credit card and cash payments. The second is “Point to Point Pay,” which involves individuals exchanging funds between themselves. “Point to Point Pay” uses an html5 page that can be shared on social media outlets such as Facebook or Wechat to send or receive ELA. Elapay can be expended for a variety of purposes – from purchasing a virtual asset in an online video game to standard online shopping expenditures. It simply represents another method of paying for goods and services at checkout.

Alpha Products
Elastos Trinity
A cross-platform browser application that runs on Android and will be available for iOS in the future. This is a form of the Elastos virtual machine and a demo of Elastos Runtime where decentralized applications written for Elastos run in a secure sandboxed environment. These are Ionic framework applications. Also, the SPV wallet functionality and the payment functions will be embedded inside the browser so that other DApps that run on Trinity can easily integrate with the available features.
Elastos Carrier SDK
Elastos Carrier provides SDK for Android (Java), iOS (Swift/Objective C), and nodeJS that can be utilized to connect to the decentralized peer to peer network that takes over all of the network traffic on the Elastos ecosystem, such as messaging, file transfer, and more.

On January 16, 2019 the Intelligent Grouping and Resource Sharing (IGRS) board issued Elastos a formal membership certificate, thus making official its entrance into the IGRS Industry Association. In conjunction with Association members, Elastos will explore the opportunities and potential synergies presented by blockchain and IoT, in the joint hopes of creating a robust IoT industry ecosystem.
Source: https://news.elastos.org/elastos-joins-the-igrs-industry-association/

Recently an ecosystem partner meetup revealed 900k TV Boxes sold and 180k registered DIDs via our partner app Viewchain. The Elephant Wallet also hit the Apple App Store and Google Play.

In June, 2018 Elastos partnered with ioeX, an internet of things platform that was much anticipated. The ioeX project is a behemoth on its own and is built on the Elastos platform.

**There are countless other exciting milestones that were achieved in 2018 and planned for 2019. Refer to https://news.elastos.org/.*\*

Market Sizing, Factors, and ELA's Potential
In the current market, Elastos' market cap of fluctuates between $31 million and $35 million with ~14,574,261 ELA coins in circulation ($2.1 to $2.3 per ELA) and total coin supply of 34,104,561.

ELA is currently listed on LBANK, CoinEgg, Huobi, HBUS, Kucoin, BCEX, and BIT-Z, the majority of which are low volume exchanges.

Binance Exchange controversy: Although various sources say different things, the evidence points to one plausible story: The Elastos foundation refused to pay Binance's listing fee and backed out of the listing the coin. Binance followed suit by tarnishing the project reputation using various media.

Based on the projects scope, the team's background and leadership, the project's backers, affiliations, and partnerships, and projects with similar mandates the project has the potential to be worth close to $500 million (15x) in the short term (less than 12 months) and several billion over the longer term (1 to 2 years).

The largest barrier to achieving it's objectives is adoption by developers. The chicken or the egg dilemma is that some argue listing ELA on major exchanges will incentivize developers to build on the platform because the coins value will appreciate others ague that the underlying technology must far outperform the incumbent to incentivize migration and hence drive the coins value. It's probably a combination of the two.

I would love to hear your thoughts and opinions on this assessment.

Thanks!
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Daily analysis of cryptocurrencies 20190920(Market index 41 — Fear state)

Daily analysis of cryptocurrencies 20190920(Market index 41 — Fear state)

https://preview.redd.it/1oz8rns7orn31.png?width=960&format=png&auto=webp&s=bf857f2d550b45be6664718a7956eb1274b868c5

Korean Conglomerate CJ Develops Blockchain For Music Copyright CJ, one of South Korea’s largest conglomerates, is developing a blockchain-based music copyright management system using AWS’ Amazon Managed Blockchain Service, according to local media. Korean news agency Yonhap said in a report on Sept. 19 that the initiative is being led by CJ OliveNetworks, a subsidiary of the CJ Corp parent company that operates the beauty retail and technology business of the conglomerate.
CME Group To Launch Bitcoin Options In Q1 2020 CME Group, the world’s leading and most diverse derivatives marketplace, announced on Sept 20 it will launch options on its Bitcoin futures contracts in Q1 2020
OCBC First Singapore Bank To Join JPMorgan’s Blockchain Network OCBC has become the first Singapore bank to join JPMorgan’s live blockchain service — known as the interbank information network (IIN), JPMorgan said on Sept 20. The Singapore lender joins 112 other banks from the Asia-Pacific in joining the IIN, with regional banks dominating the list of new entrants. Asia-Pacific banks that have signed up on the network now total 134, making up nearly 40 percent of the 343 banks that have signed up since 2018. The 80 Japanese banks that have signed up also form the largest bloc globally.
45 Bitcoin Miners Consumed Electricity More Than 3 Regions Of Kyrgyzstan Combined There is no such concept as cryptocurrency miner in Kyrgyz laws, said Chief of the National Energy Holding Company of Kyrgyzstan Aitmamat Nazarov in response to MP’s question if mining companies and Bitcoins were legal in Kyrgyzstan. “We don’t provide electricity designated specially for cryptocurrency miner companies. It was revealed that 45 mining companies consumed 136 MW of electricity and we had to cut off power to them, because they consumed more than 3 regions of Kyrgyzstan — Issyk-Kul, Talas and Naryn — consumed together,” Nazarov said.

Encrypted project calendar(September 20, 2019)

NULS / NULS: The NULS 2.0 Beta hackathon will be held from September 20th to September 21st, 2019. AE/Aeternity: Aeternity (AE) will hold “Cosmos One” conference in Prague, Czech Republic on September 20th COCOS/COCOS: The Cocos-BCX (COCOS) Oasis Arena hackathon will take place from September 20th to 22nd in Shanghai, China (“GO Shanghai”). RVN/Ravencoin: The Ravencoin (RVN) Ravencoin project team will host the “Ravencoin Asia 2019” party in Seoul, South Korea on September 20. GOB: Go online on the IDAX exchange and open the GOB/BTC trading market

Encrypted project calendar(September 21, 2019)

BTC/Bitcoin: The 6th FINWISE Global Summit Macau will be held from September 21st to 22nd. Distributed Financial Technology (DeFi) is the main topic of this conference. OKB/OKB: OKB (OKB) OKEx The Africa Cryptour series of talks in Kenya will take place on September 21 in Nairobi. ADA/Cardano: Cardano (ADA) Cardano Ambassador Marin Kramaric will host the Ada community gathering in Croatia on September 21. ZIL/Zilliqa: The Zilliqa (ZIL) Zilliqa project representative will attend the “Bitcoin and Blockchain Future” conference in London, UK on September 21st.

Encrypted project calendar(September 22, 2019)

NPXS/Pundi X: Pundi X (NPXS) PundiX Labs will officially launch the XPOS transaction at the “AkiColle” event in Tokyo on September 22.

Encrypted project calendar(September 23, 2019)

BTC/Bitcoin: Bakkt, the digital asset platform led by ICE, the parent company of the New York Stock Exchange and the world’s second largest trading group, will launch a bitcoin physical delivery futures contract on September 23. EOS/EOS: EOS main network is expected to upgrade version 1.8 on September 23 DCDecred: Project leader Jake Yocom-Piatt of Decred (DCR) Decrex will attend the Encryption Community Party in San Francisco on September 23 and will deliver a speech.

Encrypted project calendar(September 24, 2019)

ENG/Enigma: Enigma (ENG) ENG main network token snapshot will end on September 24, the original start time is August 26. LINA (LINA): Lina Review will host the Lina network launch event in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam on September 24th and release a 10-year operational strategy. Cappasity (CAPP): Cappasity will showcase its digital signage solutions in luxury stores at the Paris Retail Week from September 24th to 26th.

Encrypted project calendar(September 25, 2019)

MIOTA/IOTA: IOTA (MIOTA) IOTA will host a community event on September 25th at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles on the theme of “Building Your Own IoT.” Quant (QNT): The Quant project will participate in a marketing conference in London from September 25th to 26th, which will focus on data technology.

Encrypted project calendar(September 26, 2019)

ADA/Cardano: The Cardano (ADA) Cardano community will host a party in Washington, DC on September 26.

Encrypted project calendar(September 27, 2019)

BTC/Bitcoin: Cripto Latin Fest will be held in Cordoba, Argentina from September 27th to 29th. Switcheo (SWTH): After a one-year token exchange process, the project team will officially end the SWH→SWTH token exchange process on September 27.

Encrypted project calendar(September 28, 2019)

ADA/Cardano: Cardano (ADA) Cardano (ADA) 2nd Anniversary, Cardinal Foundation, IOHK and EMURGO main members will participate in community celebrations in Plovdiv, Bulgaria on September 28. TOP Network (TOP): The TOP Network team will hold a hackathon in Prague, Czech Republic from September 28th to 29th. Horizen (ZEN): Horizen project BD Rep Vano Narimandize will discuss the current status and development of sidechain technology at the Industry 4.0 Blockchain Summit on September 28.

Encrypted project calendar(September 29, 2019)

GAME/GameCredits: GameCredits (GAME) is expected to perform hard forks on September 29th at block height 2519999

Encrypted project calendar(September 30, 2019)

INS/Insolar: Insolar (INS) will be on September 30th ERD/Elrond: Elrond (ERD) will conduct main network test on September 30th NULS/NULS: The NULS team will plan to beta the ChainBOX in the third quarter. CS/Credits: Credits (CS) will exchange tokens and bug rewards in the third quarter QTUM/Qtum: Quantum Chain (QTUM) is expected to complete lightning network beta in the third quarter XEM/NEM: New World Bank (XEM) will release mobile wallet and computer wallet in the third quarter HC/HyperCash: hypercash (HC) will complete community management agreement in the third quarter

Encrypted project calendar(October 01, 2019)

HT/Huobi Token: The financial base public link jointly created by Firecoin and Nervos is expected to be open source in October. RVN/Ravencoin: Ravencoin (RVN) Ravencoin will perform a hard fork on October 1. ADA/Cardano: Cardano (ADA) plans to hold technical consensus meeting in Amsterdam on October 1st XRC/Bitcoin Rhodium: Bitcoin Rhodium (XRC) will record account balance awards on October 1st PPC/Peercoin: Peercoin (PPC) will perform Peercoin v0.8 (code 螳螂) hard fork on October 1st

Encrypted project calendar(October 02, 2019)

BNB/Binance Coin: The 2019 DELTA Summit will be held in Malta from October 2nd to 4th. The DELTA Summit is Malta’s official blockchain and digital innovation campaign. CAPP/Cappasity: The Cappasity (CAPP) London Science and Technology Festival will be held from October 2nd to 3rd, when the Cappasity project will be attended by the Science and Technology Festival.

Encrypted project calendar(October 03, 2019)

ETC/Ethereum Classic: The 2019 Ether Classic (ETC) Summit will be held in Vancouver on October 3–4

Encrypted project calendar(October 05, 2019)

Ontology (ONT): Ony Ji will attend the blockchain event in Japan on October 5th and explain the practical application based on the ontology network.

Encrypted project calendar(October 06, 2019)

SPND/ Spendcoin: Spendcoin (SPND) will be online on October 6th

BTC fell nearly $9,600 yesterday to date, then stopped falling and rebounded, and has now returned to the vicinity of $10,300. In the past 24 hours, the net inflows of BTC funds approached US$200 million. Compared with the previous cycle, the market inflows increased rapidly. We mentioned earlier that the main force is likely to wash dishes in the near future. Obviously, the main force finally did something yesterday, but the strength and speed of washing dishes are faster than expected. At present, the view of the medium-term bull trend remains unchanged, with the lower support focusing on the vicinity of $10,000 and then $9,600. In terms of operation, continue to attract funds at low prices, and stop loss should not be considered for the time being before breaking through the triangle area.
Review previous articles: https://medium.com/@to.liuwen

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batching in Bitcoin

On May 6th, 2017, Bitcoin hit an all-time high in transactions processed on the network in a single day: it moved 375,000 transactions which accounted for a nominal output of about $2.5b. Average fees on the Bitcoin network had climbed over a dollar for the first time a couple days prior. And they kept climbing: by early June average fees hit an eye-watering $5.66. This was quite unprecedented. In the three-year period from Jan. 1 2014 to Jan. 1 2017, per-transaction fees had never exceeded 31 cents on a weekly average. And the hits kept coming. Before 2017 was over, average fees would top out at $48 on a weekly basis. When the crypto-recession set in, transaction count collapsed and fees crept back below $1.
During the most feverish days of the Bitcoin run-up, when normal users found themselves with balances that would cost more to send than they were worth, cries for batching — the aggregation of many outputs into a single transaction — grew louder than ever. David Harding had written a blog post on the cost-savings of batching at the end of August and it was reposted to the Bitcoin subreddit on a daily basis.
The idea was simple: for entities sending many transactions at once, clustering outputs into a single transaction was more space- (and cost-) efficient, because each transaction has a fixed data overhead. David found that if you combined 10 payments into one transaction, rather than sending them individually, you could save 75% of the block space. Essentially, batching is one way to pack as many transactions as possible into the finite block space available on Bitcoin.
When fees started climbing in mid-2017, users began to scrutinize the behavior of heavy users of the Bitcoin blockchain, to determine whether they were using block space efficiently. By and large, they were not — and an informal lobbying campaign began, in which these major users — principally exchanges — were asked to start batching transactions and be good stewards of the scarce block space at their disposal. Some exchanges had been batching for years, others relented and implemented it. The question faded from view after Bitcoin’s price collapsed in Q1 2018 from roughly $19,000 to $6000, and transaction load — and hence average fee — dropped off.
But we remained curious. A common refrain, during the collapse in on-chain usage, was that transaction count was an obfuscated method of apprehending actual usage. The idea was that transactions could encode an arbitrarily large (within reason) number of payments, and so if batching had become more and more prevalent, those payments were still occurring, just under a regime of fewer transactions.

“hmmm”
Some sites popped up to report outputs and payments per day rather than transactions, seemingly bristling at the coverage of declining transaction count. However, no one conducted an analysis of the changing relationship between transaction count and outputs or payments. We took it upon ourselves to find out.
Table Of Contents:
Introduction to batching
A timeline
Analysis
Conclusion
Bonus content: UTXO consolidation
  1. Introduction to batching
Bitcoin uses a UTXO model, which stands for Unspent Transaction Output. In comparison, Ripple and Ethereum use an account/balance model. In bitcoin, a user has no balances, only UTXOs that they control. If they want to transfer money to someone else, their wallet selects one or more UTXOs as inputs that in sum need to add up to the amount they want to transfer. The desired amount then goes to the recipient, which is called the output, and the difference goes back to the sender, which is called change output. Each output can carry a virtually unlimited amount of value in the form of satoshis. A satoshi is a unit representing a one-hundred-millionth of a Bitcoin. This is very similar to a physical wallet full of different denominations of bills. If you’re buying a snack for $2.50 and only have a $5, you don’t hand the cashier half of your 5 dollar bill — you give him the 5 and receive some change instead.
Unknown to some, there is no hardcoded limit to the number of transactions that can fit in a block. Instead, each transaction has a certain size in megabytes and constitutes an economic incentive for miners to include it in their block. Because miners have limited space of 2 MB to sell to transactors, larger transactions (in size, not bitcoin!) will need to pay higher fees to be included. Additionally, each transaction can have a virtually unlimited number of inputs or outputs — the record stands at transactions with 20,000 inputs and 13,107 outputs.
So each transaction has at least one input and at one output, but often more, as well as some additional boilerplate stuff. Most of that space is taken up by the input (often 60% or more, because of the signature that proves they really belong to the sender), while the output(s) account for 15–30%. In order to keep transactions as small as possible and save fees, Bitcoin users have two major choices:
Use as few inputs as possible. In order to minimize inputs, you can periodically send your smaller UTXOs to yourself in times when fees are very low, getting one large UTXO back. That is called UTXO consolidation or consolidating your inputs.
Users who frequently make transfers (especially within the same block) can include an almost unlimited amount of outputs (to different people!) in the same transaction. That is called transaction batching. A typical single output transaction takes up 230 bytes, while a two output transaction only takes up 260 bytes, instead of 460 if you were to send them individually.
This is something that many casual commentators overlook when comparing Bitcoin with other payment systems — a Bitcoin transaction can aggregate thousands of individual economic transfers! It’s important to recognize this, as it is the source of a great deal of misunderstanding and mistaken analysis.
We’ve never encountered a common definition of a batched transaction — so for the purposes of this study we define it in the loosest possible sense: a transaction with three or more outputs. Commonly, batching is understood as an activity undertaken primarily by mining pools or exchanges who can trade off immediacy for efficiency. It is rare that a normal bitcoin user would have cause to batch, and indeed most wallets make it difficult to impossible to construct batched transactions. For everyday purposes, normal bitcoiners will likely not go to the additional effort of batching transactions.
We set the threshold at three for simplicity’s sake — a normal unbatched transaction will have one transactional output and one change output — but the typical major batched transaction from an exchange will have dozens if not hundreds of outputs. For this reason we are careful to provide data on various different batch sizes, so we could determine the prevalence of three-output transactions and colossal, 100-output ones.
We find it helpful to think of a Bitcoin transaction as a mail truck full of boxes. Each truck (transaction) contains boxes (outputs), each of contains some number of letters (satoshis). So when you’re looking at transaction count as a measure of the performance and economic throughput of the Bitcoin network, it’s a bit like counting mail trucks to discern how many letters are being sent on a given day, even though the number of letters can vary wildly. The truck analogy also makes it clear why many see Bitcoin as a settlement layer in the future — just as mail trucks aren’t dispatched until they’re full, some envision that the same will ultimately be the case for Bitcoin.

Batching
  1. A timeline
So what actually happened in the last six months? Let’s look at some data. Daily transactions on the Bitcoin network rose steadily until about May 2017, when average fees hit about $4. This precipitated the first collapse in usage. Then began a series of feedback loops over the next six months in which transaction load grew, fees grew to match, and transactions dropped off. This cycle repeated itself five times over the latter half of 2017.

more like this on coinmetrics.io
The solid red line in the above chart is fees in BTC terms (not USD) and the shaded red area is daily transaction count. You can see the cycle of transaction load precipitating higher fees which in turn cause a reduction in usage. It repeats itself five or six times before the detente in spring 2018. The most notable period was the December-January fee crisis, but fees were actually fairly typical in BTC terms — the rising BTC price in USD however meant that USD fees hit extreme figures.
In mid-November when fees hit double digits in USD terms, users began a concerted campaign to convince exchanges to be better stewards of block space. Both Segwit and batching were held up as meaningful approaches to maximize the compression of Bitcoin transactions into the finite block space available. Data on when exchanges began batching is sparse, but we collected information where it was available into a chart summarizing when exchanges began batching.

Batching adoption at selected exchanges
We’re ignoring Segwit adoption by exchanges in this analysis; as far as batching is concerned, the campaign to get exchanges to batch appears to have persuaded Bitfinex, Binance, and Shapeshift to batch. Coinbase/GDAX have stated their intention to begin batching, although they haven’t managed to integrate it yet. As far as we can tell, Gemini hasn’t mentioned batching, although we have some mixed evidence that they may have begun recently. If you know about the status of batching on Gemini or other major exchanges please get in touch.
So some exchanges have been batching all along, and some have never bothered at all. Did the subset of exchanges who flipped the switch materially affect the prevalence of batched transactions? Let’s find out.
  1. Analysis
3.1 How common is batching?
We measured the prevalence of batching in three different ways, by transaction count, by output value and by output count.

The tl;dr.
Batching accounts for roughly 12% of all transactions, 40% of all outputs, and 30–60% of all raw BTC output value. Not bad.
3.2 Have batched transactions become more common over time?
From the chart in 3.1, we can already see a small, but steady uptrend in all three metrics, but we want to dig a little deeper. So we first looked at the relationship of payments (all outputs that actually pay someone, so total outputs minus change outputs) and transactions.

More at transactionfee.info/charts
The first thing that becomes obvious is that the popular narrative — that the drop in transactions was caused by an increase in batching — is not the case; payments dropped by roughly the same proportion as well.
Dividing payment count by transaction count gives us some insight into the relationship between the two.

In our analysis we want to zoom into the time frame between November 2017 and today, and we can see that payments per transactions have actually been rallying, from 1.5 payments per transaction in early 2017 to almost two today.
3.3 What are popular batch sizes?
In this next part, we will look at batch sizes to see which are most popular. To determine which transactions were batched, we downloaded a dataset of all transactions on the Bitcoin network between November 2017 and May 2018from Blockchair.
We picked that period because the fee crisis really got started in mid-November, and with it, the demands for exchanges to batch. So we wanted to capture the effect of exchanges starting to batch. Naturally a bigger sample would have been more instructive, but we were constrained in our resources, so we began with the six month sample.
We grouped transactions into “batched” and “unbatched” groups with batched transactions being those with three or more outputs.

We then divided batched transactions into roughly equal groups on the basis of how much total output in BTC they had accounted for in the six-month period. We didn’t select the batch sizes manually — we picked batch sizes that would split the sample into equal parts on the basis of transaction value. Here’s what we ended up with:

All of the batch buckets have just about the same fraction of total BTC output over the period, but they account for radically different transaction and output counts over the period. Notice that there were only 183,108 “extra large” batches (with 41 or more outputs) in the six-month period, but between them there were 23m outputs and 30m BTC worth of value transmitted.
Note that output value in this context refers to the raw or unadjusted figure — it would have been prohibitively difficult for us to adjust output for change or mixers, so we’re using the “naive” estimate.
Let’s look at how many transactions various batch sizes accounted for in the sample period:


Batched transactions steadily increased relative to unbatched ones, although the biggest fraction is the small batch with between 3 and 5 outputs. The story for output counts is a bit more illuminating. Even though batched transactions are a relatively small fraction of overall transaction count, they contain a meaningful number of overall outputs. Let’s see how it breaks down:


Lastly, let’s look at output value. Here we see that batched transactions represent a significant fraction of value transmitted on Bitcoin.


As we can see, even though batched transactions make up an average of only 12% of all transactions, they move between 30%-60% of all Bitcoins, at peak times even 70%. We think this is quite remarkable. Keep in mind, however that the ‘total output’ figure has not been altered to account for change outputs, mixers, or self-churn; that is, it is the raw and unadjusted figure. The total output value is therefore not an ideal approximation of economic volume on the Bitcoin network.
3.4 Has transaction count become an unreliable measure of Bitcoin’s usage because of batching?
Yes. We strongly encourage any analysts, investors, journalists, and developers to look past mere transaction count from now on. The default measure of Bitcoin’s performance should be “payments per day” rather than transaction count. This also makes Bitcoin more comparable with other UTXO chains. They generally have significantly variable payments-per-transaction ratios, so just using payments standardizes that. (Stay tuned: Coinmetrics will be rolling out tools to facilitate this very soon.)
More generally, we think that the economic value transmitted on the network is its most fundamental characteristic. Both the naive and the adjusted figures deserve to be considered. Adjusting raw output value is still more art than science, and best practices are still being developed. Again, Coinmetrics is actively developing open-source tools to make these adjustments available.
  1. Conclusion
We started by revisiting the past year in Bitcoin and showed that while the mempool was congested, the community started looking for ways to use the blockspace more efficiently. Attention quickly fell on batching, the practice of combining multiple outputs into a single transaction, for heavy users. We showed how batching works on a technical level and when different exchanges started implementing the technique.
Today, around 12% of all transactions on the Bitcoin network are batched, and these account for about 40% of all outputs and between 30–60% of all transactional value. The fact such that a small set of transactions carries so much economic weight makes us hopeful that Bitcoin still has a lot of room to scale on the base layer, especially if usage trends continue.
Lastly, it’s worth noting that the increase in batching on the Bitcoin network may not be entirely due to deliberate action by exchanges, but rather a function of its recessionary behavior in the last few months. Since batching is generally done by large industrial players like exchanges, mixers, payment processors, and mining pools, and unbatched transactions are generally made by normal individuals, the batched/unbatched ratio is also a strong proxy for how much average users are using Bitcoin. Since the collapse in price, it is quite possible that individual usage of Bitcoin decreased while “industrial” usage remained strong. This is speculation, but one explanation for what happened.
Alternatively, the industrial players appear to be taking their role as stewards of the scarce block space more seriously. This is a significant boon to the network, and a nontrivial development in its history. If a culture of parsimony can be encouraged, Bitcoin will be able to compress more data into its block space and everyday users will continue to be able to run nodes for the foreseeable future. We view this as a very positive development. Members of the Bitcoin community that lobbied exchanges to add support for Segwit and batching should be proud of themselves.
  1. Bonus content: UTXO consolidation
Remember that we said that a second way to systematically save transaction fees in the Bitcoin network was to consolidate your UTXOs when fees were low? Looking at the relationship between input count and output count allows us to spot such consolidation phases quite well.

Typically, inputs and outputs move together. When the network is stressed, they decouple. If you look at the above chart carefully, you’ll notice that when transactions are elevated (and block space is at a premium), outputs outpace inputs — look at the gaps in May and December 2017. However, prolonged activity always results in fragmented UTXO sets and wallets full of dust, which need to be consolidated. For this, users often wait until pressure on the network has decreased and fees are lower. Thus, after transactions decrease, inputs become more common than outputs. You can see this clearly in February/March 2017.

Here we’ve taken the ratio of inputs to outputs (which have been smoothed on a trailing 7 day basis). When the ratio is higher, there are more inputs than outputs on that day, and vice versa. You can clearly see the spam attack in summer 2015 in which thousands (possibly millions) of outputs were created and then consolidated. Once the ratio spikes upwards, that’s consolidation. The spike in February 2018 after the six weeks of high fees in December 2017 was the most pronounced sigh of relief in Bitcoin’s history; the largest ever departure from the in/out ratio norm. There were a huge number of UTXOs to be consolidated.
It’s also interesting to note where inputs and outputs cluster. Here we have histograms of transactions with large numbers of inputs or outputs. Unsurprisingly, round numbers are common which shows that exchanges don’t publish a transaction every, say, two minutes, but instead wait for 100 or 200 outputs to queue up and then publish their transaction. Curiously, 200-input transactions were more popular than 100-input transactions in the period.


We ran into more curiosities when researching this piece, but we’ll leave those for another time.
Future work on batching might focus on:
Determining batched transactions as a portion of (adjusted) economic rather than raw volume
Looking at the behavior of specific exchanges with regards to batching
Investigating how much space and fees could be saved if major exchanges were batching transactions
Lastly, we encourage everyone to run their transactions through the service at transactionfee.info to assess the efficiency of their transactions and determine whether exchanges are being good stewards of the block space.
Update 31.05.2018
Antoine Le Calvez has created a series of live-updated charts to track batching and batch sizes, which you can find here.
We’d like to thank 0xB10C for their generous assistance with datasets and advice, the people at Blockchair for providing the core datasets, and David A. Harding for writing the initial piece and answering our questions.
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MinedBlock - Mining As A Service.

MinedBlock - Mining As A Service.

https://preview.redd.it/z9qndkht4vb31.png?width=788&format=png&auto=webp&s=25d1b844389dc51a159ea5f88f126e8febec6e75
MinedBlock offers the opportunity for investors to take advantage of using the resources from a large-scale mining operation, mining multiple crypto assets without the need to buy, configure and maintain expensive mining equipment. Our unique approach to this activity gives you a fully secured and compliant token granting you a share of ownership of the holding company behind the service and not just a ‘random utility token’.
MinedBlock is a Fintech Crypto Mining & Infrastructure Service Provider specialising in transaction processing, or ‘mining’, for crypto currency transactions. The ‘Parent’ company MinedBlock Limited will own all of the assets, infrastructure and operation while the ‘Subsidiary’ company will own the ‘Service’. The reason behind this model is to tokenise equity in the subsidiary while retaining private ownership of all the assets in the parent company. 25% of revenues will be retained by the parent company to be used for ongoing expansion and operational costs. Miners, collectively, provide the backbone infrastructure network for cryptocurrency blockchains, the blockchain provides a single, distributed ledger across multiple ‘nodes’ (specialist mining hardware) which perform the activity of ‘mining’ transactions. The blockchain is a distributed, un-editable database which stores transaction information, crypto wallet* balances and details of minted (newly created) coins. Mining validates those transactions, processes payments and updates them to the distributed ledger in a new block. Each block contains a reward of new cryptocurrency which is awarded to the miner (minted) along with the transaction fees for the processed payments in that block. For example, a miner who mines a new bitcoin block would earn 12.5 Bitcoins plus 0.25** Bitcoin in transaction fees. In the beginning, Bitcoin was a person-to-person (P2P) method of transferring ‘value’ and was mined using generic laptop and desktop computers. Over the last decade; the popularity, use case and validity of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies has grown beyond the ability of most people to stay involved with mining. Whilst the exchange/brokerage side of the crypto ‘industry’ has evolved and firmly established leaders such as Coinbase or Binance, there isn’t really a comparable entity in the mining arena. Bitmain is probably the biggest but they are primarily a hardware manufacturer and don’t focus solely on transaction processing. Their remit is limited to the range of assets that they can mine using the hardware they manufacture and own. During the 2018 ‘crypto bull’ market, many mining companies appeared but failed to properly prepare for the event of a downturn and in the ‘bear’ market in the latter half of 2018 have disappeared. At the point in December 2017 where Bitcoin price peaked at $20,000 the blockchain couldn’t cope with the sheer volume of transactions and the fees were astronomical. Transactions were taking over 2 hours and costing up to $40 in fees. The total crypto market value is still relatively low at the moment, so the opportunity is ripe for MinedBlock to establish ourselves as a company bringing a corporate approach to the crypto mining industry. By establishing ourselves while the crypto market value is lower, we are protecting ourselves and our investors against any potential future downturns.
https://preview.redd.it/kehz0rfw4vb31.png?width=570&format=png&auto=webp&s=79bea7844ee990f4ba24df4b60fbcf2aa2750a44

Advantages

+ Scalable MinedBlock’s service is endlessly scalable, in order to grow the service we simply would install and configure more mining equipment. There isn’t any technical limitation to how big it could get. MinedBlock has the ability to quickly and easily expand into multiple revenue streams including, but not limited to, expansion of the range of mined crypto assets and the ability to host private mining services. + Agile Initially, 40% of our infrastructure will be dedicated to cryptocurrency other than Bitcoin, this will enable the service to flex and switch between the asset being mined allowing us to always target the assets with the best returns based on market demand. The 60% initial allocation to Bitcoin can also be adjusted based on market prices and returns. + Sustainable MinedBlock is focussed on hosting our infrastructure in areas that can provide 100% renewable energy. + Market Immunity Phase 2 of the project, which is out of scope for this round of funding, will be to build our own renewable energy sources to offset electricity costs, the primary ongoing cost factor, thus enabling continuous revenue production regardless of crypto market prices. + Projected Revenue MinedBlock will produce revenue through mining a strategically selected range of cryptocurrencies. Another way to ‘mine’ crypto is to buy and hold a minimum number of a coin in a wallet which entitles the holder to a share of transaction fees (similar to earning interest on a savings account). This is known as a ‘Proof of Stake’ method of mining. Publishing a wallet for Proof of Stake mining is called hosting a masternode. There are always new technological advances in the mining industry including strategies and technologies which we are prepared to adopt and add to our service. + Unique Selling Point (USP) Our USP compared to the competition is that we plan to make ourselves fully immune from the market, prioritise our investors (over ourselves) and be 100% transparent in everything we say and do. Most other mining firms have focused on just ‘out of the box’ mining and not considered any form of cost reduction or alternative revenue generation such as masternodes, and this has left them unprofitable and unable to continue. Our aims go far beyond ‘just being another mining company’ we intend to dominate the space as quickly as possible. At this stage, there isn’t really any meaningful competitor in the marketplace as the mining industry is still in its infancy.

Learn more

✉️ Website: https://www.minedblock.io/ ✉️ Telegram Group (http://t.me/MinedBlockOfficial)
✉️ Telegram Channel (http://t.me/MinedBlock)
📈 WhitePaper (https://www.minedblock.io/assets/MinedBlockWhitepaper.pdf)
👤 Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/MinedBlock/)
🐥 Twitter (https://twitter.com/mined_block)
📢 Bounty (https://beta.bounty0x.io/hosts/MinedBlock)
🌧 Airdrop (https://forms.gle/8aJmB1A4Pbx2ES8F6)
📰 Reddit (https://www.reddit.com/MinedBlock)
Bounty0x username : @bandit
submitted by Bandugan to ico [link] [comments]

ColossusXT Q1 2019 AMA Ends!

Thank you for being a part of the ColossusXT Reddit AMA! Below we will summarize the questions and answers. The team responded to 22 questions! If your question was not included, it may have been answered in a previous question or AMA. The ColossusXT team will do a Reddit AMA at the end of every quarter.
We do have a question. Should we change the two examples that we have used for the past year, or should we continue to use those?
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The winner of the Q4 AMA Contest is: Gettyspurgu
You will receive a message from me shortly for a deposit address.
Thank you to everyone who participated.
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Q: Why does your blockchain exist and what makes it unique?
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A: ColossusXT exists to provide an energy efficient method of supercomputing. ColossusXT is unique in many ways. Some coins have 1 layer of privacy. ColossusXT and the Colossus Grid will utilize 2 layers of privacy through Obfuscation Zerocoin Protocol, and I2P and these will protect users of the Colossus Grid as they utilize grid resources. There are also Masternodes and Proof of Stake which both can contribute to reducing 51% attacks, along with instant transactions and zero-fee transactions. This protection is paramount as ColossusXT evolves into the Colossus Grid. Grid Computing will have a pivotal role throughout the world, and what this means is that users will begin to experience the Internet as a seamless computational universe. Software applications, databases, sensors, video and audio streams-all will be reborn as services that live in cyberspace, assembling and reassembling themselves on the fly to meet the tasks at hand. Once plugged into the grid, a desktop machine will draw computational horsepower from all the other computers on the grid.
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Q: What is the Colossus Grid?
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A: ColossusXT is an anonymous blockchain through obfuscation. Zerocoin Protocol, along with utilization of Armis (I2P). These features will protect end user privacy as ColossusXT evolves into the Colossus Grid. The Colossus Grid will connect devices in a peer-to-peer network enabling users and applications to rent the cycles and storage of other users’ machines. This marketplace of computing power and storage will exclusively run on COLX currency. These resources will be used to complete tasks requiring any amount of computation time and capacity, or allow end users to store data anonymously across the COLX decentralized network. Today, such resources are supplied by entities such as centralized cloud providers which are constrained by closed networks, proprietary payment systems, and hard-coded provisioning operations. Any user ranging from a single PC owner to a large data center can share resources through Colossus Grid and get paid in COLX for their contributions. Renters of computing power or storage space, on the other hand, may do so at low prices compared to the usual market prices because they are only using resources that already exist.

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Q: Could you give me 3 points where COLX exceeds other crypto and 1/2 point where you think COLX lacks behind or could do better. (Pardon me if my English is not perfect)
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A: Sure.
Exceeds:
  1. Community Service and Support – ColossusXT provides 24/7 support in our Discord Server
  2. Dedication – The ColossusXT team holds quarterly AMA’s and look forward to community questions and feedback. We are active daily in Discord to address ANY concerns or questions.
  3. ColossusXT is building a product, rather than hyping up a nonexistent product.
Lacks:
  1. Marketing – As above, we are well aware that our marketing presence is not as active or strong as many of these other projects. I believe that many of these projects will die off, and the only thing keeping them alive is their marketing. They have stopped building, ColossusXT is very goal and task oriented. Marketing is intended to pick up as we get closer to the Colossus Grid going live.

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Q: Hi
My question to the ColossusXT team :
Can you tell us more clearly about the environmentally conscious cryptocurrency. In what way is it environmentally conscious
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A: You use less energy to mine Proof of Stake blockchains than you do with Proof of Work blockchains. As the Colossus Grid comes online, the computing power that you can rent cycles from, and the decentralized storage will also be at competitive pricing with current systems.

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Q: What is colx doing different from the hundreds of other low market cap coins to rise up and be a player in this saturated market?
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A: ColossusXT’s greater purpose is the Colossus Grid. Please take some time to check out our whitepaper, there is also some sample descriptions of ColossusXT and the Colossus Grid in the first post of this AMA.

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Q: What projects are the COLX team working on in order to promote/achieve mass adoption and usage?
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A: It's difficult to announce anything before the processes are finalized. We have some strategic marketing plans in place for the Colossus Grid that will bring a significant amount more visibility to the Colossus Grid and ColossusXT. I really don't like answering questions by saying I cannot share this information, but in this case; I do apologize.

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Q: How does COLX in its current state and development lend itself to grid computing? For example, why fork from PIVX to make a grid computing coin?
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A: We forked from PIVX because each team member values privacy as a right, and our community is built around thousands of individuals who believe in your right to privacy, and want to make the world a better place by reducing energy consumption and allow access to supercomputing power to any researching, business, or person in the world.

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Q: Hey team! Just wondering COLX initially intended to make their own payment method if I recall correctly. Is the plan to just use these third party cards or are we eventually going to implement our own. I feel like this may bring great value to the project for us being less dependent on other companies. Cheers!
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A: We are currently focusing much of our development funding and time towards the Colossus Grid, we may have more time to focus on this in the future. Currently we have integrated with Polis and Plaak cards in the meantime. We also intend to make fiat purchases available in wallet and will be available on an exchange in the coming weeks.

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Q: As a ColX investor I would like to ask the critical question, why would any online or real store accept colX over many other crypto currencies, that are either more established or more well known.
Can you answer me this as reflective and honest as possible?
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A: Many of these larger projects have also completed large ICO’s. What will make ColossusXT stand out is the level of development we will continue to push and the continued relationships and partnerships we form that will have a meaningful impact on the Colossus Grid; Having no ICO and no premine ColossusXT may seem like a small marketcap coin to many investors, and in a statistical standpoint it certainly is, but at one point those competing projects were not established, and they were not well known. We are here to build the Colossus Grid network, and continue to improve on that network for years to come.

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Q: Do you think there’s any merit in considering a name change, perhaps coupled with a brand re-launch? “ColussusXT” is rather a mouthful!
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A: We have this question come up every AMA I think, and we have given it some serious discussion. It is certainly possible, about a year ago we rebranded from ColossusCoinXT to ColossusXT.

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Q: COLX is quite far in its development now. With that in mind, can the team give us any details as to the architecture for the Colossus Grid? What are its specifications, for example?
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A: A detailed business plan for the Colossus Grid will be revealed soon. The technical details are being worked in a private repo until Beta. Prior to Beta launch when we have all of our ducks in a row. We will release technical details and create a branch in GitHub.

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Q: the daily volume is sometimes below 1k usd, that really is pretty much nothing. how soon can we expect a listing at a "bigger" exchange like for example kucoin?
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A: Listing with some of the larger exchanges requested by the community requires some legal documents that we needed to procure and compliance regulations within the United States. We have acquired them this week thanks to our amazing legal team, and we hope to offer some more exciting exchange opportunities to the ColossusXT community very soon.

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Q: Also are you guys planning to decrease roi on the masternodes and stakingas it is still quite high to seem realistic
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A: We have one of the lowest of the crypto projects. About the time you wrote this question there was a bug in the masternode tracker, and it has since been fixed. Please let me know if this was your concern when you have some time. Thank you

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Q: If you have no money, where will you get it to develop the project? Public recognition will not push the token up if the team has no money for its development. Society recognizes that cryptocurrency, which in a short time achieves great results. And with the help of one enthusiasm, you will not achieve much in any economic sector.
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A: I think there may be some confusion here. We don’t have 0$ funding. We use our own income, the dev fund, and the community crowdfunds for certain opportunities. We have limited funding, which basically means we thoroughly double check everything before spending a dime, we use much of our funding for development of the Colossus Grid.

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Q: Where do you see ColossusXT 10 years from now?
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A: In 10 years I see ColossusXT as a leader in supercomputing and distributed storage industries. ColossusXT will bring cheaper, and more efficient methods of storing and computing, drastically reducing cost and energy consumption to process and store big DATA. "Why our blockchain exists?" takes this further for you; As the Colossus Grid network grows, the strength of it's computing power will grow. Hopefully in 10 years we have cheaper supercomputing power that has helped colleges and researches further their dream of solving problems, answering the difficult question; Skynet does creep into the back of my head from time to time though. ;)

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Q: Will to be possible to bridge a Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) or SAP like system to provide corporate solution not only for recording business transaction but also to protect Corporations data using COLX protocal?
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A: Colossus Grid will be able to be used either in individual or in corporate level. Depending on the need, corporations can utilize Colx coins to buy storage and make their data protected over Grid instead of depending on servers if relevant.

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Q: After the incident of fake stake attack how do you guarantee the security of chain-based Pos? I mean how you improve the security to prevent or not to happen it again? As you mention that colx is alternative to bitcoin. Is there a possible of mass adoption to colx like bitcoin(btc past 10 years)? If yes. How could it be?
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A: Yes. The Fake Staking bug did not affect your coins, it would cause your wallet to crash for the most part. We are currently doing a massive codebase upgrade, to fine tune and continue to scale our technology and security with technology as it changes.
Certainly mass adoption is possible, but as Bitcoin is not building a network for distributed computing power and storage, we still have some work to do for mass adoption.

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Q: Remote activation is possible for masternodes and it is much safer. Is there already a blockchain technology to do that for staking? If not, is it possible to invent it and apply it in COLX?
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A: There is currently no roadmap item to enable remote activation or offline storage for staking wallets. As a community-based project COLX does honor feature requests when the community demand justifies the cost of implementation or when the community is able to directly fund the change, however, we have not seen any demand for remote staking activation thus far. If this becomes a more common request, we could definitely consider using our monetary resources to add that to the COLX featureset.

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Q: How many Funds do you have left to keep the project running if the bear stays a year longer?
In other words: How safe is my money in colx Tokens?
I dont have a problem to hold them for many years. But I have a problem if you're going to quit the project before the bull returns :-P
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A: ColossusXT was initially built with team funding, to us; it is very important that we complete the Colossus Grid not only for the ColossusXT community, but to show the entire blockchain industry that you do not need an ICO, or a premine to create something great. The Colossus Grid will allow any user to rent or share computing power or storage across the ColossusXT decentralized network. Now we continue to work with funding contributions directly from core team members, we are also utilizing masternode governance that has also increased our funding since ColossusXT was initially launched and several community crowdfunds have been successfully completed. The bear market could continue, and ColossusXT will continue building and optimising the ColossusXT network and the Colossus Grid. We have set out with a mission, and we fully intend to complete our mission of bringing cheap and efficient computing power to anyone in the world.

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Q: How many active developers does COLX have?
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A: 5 active developers are currently apart of the ColossusXT team. We do intend to grow our team with more developers who are passionate about grid computing, creative and willing to break boundaries.

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Q: What are the prerequisites for a system to join Colossus Grid for sharing computing power and storage space?
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A: These details will be released prior to Beta invitations being sent out. There is much that will change between Alpha and Beta.

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Q: Are there any plans to actively promote growth of open source contributions towards ColossusXT core or peripherals?
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A: All COLX development is open source and available on GitHUB. COLX is a community-based project and we encourage talented developers who wish to contribute to contact to the team to see how they can best contribute. The COLX development team is currently focusing on delivering our core applications in a timely manner as outlined in the roadmap. As that work nears completion, we will be looking to expand the team and the COLX product into a variety of peripheral use cases.

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Q: What are your thoughts as to why trade satoshi is delisting COLX?
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A: Tradesatoshi is delisting COLX, along with several other coins, due to their new volume policy. After being listed on Cryptopia last year, most of the COLX volume had departed Tradesatoshi. While it would be nice to have COLX still listed on Tradesatoshi, it likely would lose any potential volume once Cryptopia fully reopens with deposits/withdrawals. The team is committed to applying for larger and better exchanges to help increase volume and the availability to larger numbers of investors. Please keep in mind that the current deadline to transfer any remaining coins from Tradesatoshi is April 15th.

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Q: Hey guys, first of all, great job on the recent addition to Binance Info's transparency initiative. Keep up the great work!
In thinking about potential markets for grid computing, one area that I and many other crypto enthusiasts and miners are already familiar with is hashrate clearing houses like Nicehash. Nicehash is a great service but, just like a centralized crypto exchange, requires trusting a centralized point of failure in order to function. As we've seen in the past, this can lead to issues.
With all that said, it would be great if, in the future, mining hashpower could be bought and sold through a grid computing marketplace in a way that is decentralized, private and trustless. I was wondering if the team had given any thought to a pilot test of the upcoming grid by integrating well known open source mining software as a working platform for compute power buyers and sellers.
I think doing this would have two key advantages:
1. Crypto miners are generally familiar with the process of holding and moving around smaller cap altcoins with their native wallets and may not have an issue buying or selling COLX to complete grid transactions, so in a lot of ways these kinds of folks are ideal candidates to be the first users of the COLX Grid; and
2. If miners come on board in a meaningful way, it may help establish some buying and selling volume for COLX as contracts are bought and sold. This is obviously important for future price stability.
I know that's a lot, but I figured this was a good place to ask and I'd love to know the team's thoughts on this. Thanks for your time and once again, keep it up!
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A: Yes, we have discussed this previously as a team. It is possible that some of the computing power being rented on the decentralized marketplace is being used to mine other cryptocurrencies. While this is not initially the intended purpose for using computing power on the Colossus Grid. It certainly is thinking outside the box, and I’m eager to read some of the future results from community members who do use it for this purpose.

Important Information:

Website
Whitepaper
Roadmap
GitHub
Wiki
Governance
Partners

Follow ColossusXT on:

Twitter
Facebook
Telegram
Discord
Forums
Interested in joining the ColossusXT team?
Contribute an Idea!

AMA History:

2018 Q1
2018 Q2
2018 Q3
2018 Q4
submitted by PioyPioyPioy to ColossuscoinX [link] [comments]

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